Medical Talk Intro

Betty LaMarr Medical Talk Show Introduction

Dr. Rajesh Kabra, Memphis Business Journal named 2015 Top 40
under 40 will join Betty LaMarr on Medical Talk Tuesday January 12 "live "On Cable Tonite Show"

Dr. Rajesh Kabra, Cardio Electrophysiologist

Betty LaMarr Medical Talk: Exclusive Interview with Dr. Rajesh Kabra, Cardio Electrophysiologist
"One of the Master's." Voted Top 40 Under 40 in the Memphis Business Journal!

Cardiac Arrest with Dr. Rajesh Kabra

Betty LaMarr's Exclusive Interview with Dr. Rajesh Kabra, Cardio Electrophysiologist at Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare and Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Rajesh Kabra honored by the Memphis Business Journal as " 2015 Top 40 under 40".
Dr. Kabra is one of the Masters! I am honored to have him to be my guest on Medical Talk.

Medical Talk Show News, Dr. Rajesh Kabra, Cardiologist

Dr. Rajesh Kabra to join Betty LaMarr on Medical Talk News.

Medical Talk News Show: AFib and Strokes

 

AFib affects over 2 million people in the U.S. alone

What is AFib?

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is the most common type of irregular heartbeat. It occurs when one or both of the upper chambers of the heart – called the atria – don’t beat the way they should. This can cause blood to pool in the left atrium, where a blood clot can form. If that clot breaks away, it can travel to the brain, where it can cause a type of stroke called an ischemic (is-KEE-mic) stroke. An ischemic stroke occurs when a clot lodges in an artery supplying blood to the brain, reducing blood flow and depriving part of the brain of oxygen and nutrients.

AFib affects more than 2 million people in the United States. The odds of developing AFib go up with age. In fact, it is estimated that AFib is the most common type of irregular heartbeat in people over the age of 65.

doctor checking patient for fib and risk of stroke

Do you know the symptoms of AFib?

It is possible to have AFib without having any symptoms and to be unaware of your condition until a doctor discovers it during a physical exam.

When there are symptoms, they can include:

  • palpitations
  • weakness
  • fatigue
  • reduced ability to exercise
  • lightheadedness
  • dizziness
  • confusion
  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain

Do you know the signs of a stroke?

If you or your loved one has AFib, you’ll need to know the signs of stroke. By using the simple acronym F.A.S.T., you’ll be able to quickly recognize if your loved one may be suffering a stroke. That’s important because it could be a situation where seconds count.

Take a few minutes to commit this acronym to memory:

  • FACE: Ask your loved one to smile. Does one side of his or her face droop?
  • ARMS: Ask your loved one to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • SPEECH: Ask your loved one to repeat a simple phrase. Does his or her speech sound slurred or strange?
  • TIME: Time is crucial. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you or your loved one has any of these symptoms

Working closely with your doctor is important to develop a treatment plan that can help reduce your risk of stroke. Our Doctor Discussion Guide can help you ask the right questions to assist your doctor in deciding if PRADAXA is right for you.

Some common myths about AFib

With the tremendous amount of material about AFib available, you may occasionally come across conflicting information. We’re here to help dispel some common AFib myths. These include:

Myth 1:
 Everyone who has AFib will have symptoms.
Not true. Some people with AFib will have no symptoms at all, and yet may still suffer a sudden stroke.
Myth 2:
 If you take medication for AFib and no longer have symptoms, you’re cured.
The fact is you may still have AFib whether or not you feel symptoms, and it is very often a lifelong condition.
Myth 3:
 Warfarin, also known as Coumadin® or Jantoven®, is the only medication approved by the FDA to reduce risk of stroke due to AFib.
Not true. Among the new drugs approved for this condition, PRADAXA was the first alternative to warfarin approved by the FDA to reduce the risk of stroke due to AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. See how the two compare. Since FDA approval in October 2010, nearly 10 million prescriptions have been filled in the U.S.

Learn more about the risk factors for developing AFib.

AFib can put you at 5x greater risk of a stroke

The number of AFib-related strokes can be staggering

Did you know that every year in this country, about 156,000 people have AFib-related strokes? Here are some other facts too important to ignore:

  • AFib causes up to 1 in every 5 strokes
  • Some people with AFib may have no symptoms

An ischemic stroke occurs when a clot lodges in an artery supplying blood to the brain, reducing blood flow and depriving part of the brain of oxygen and nutrients. The most important way to reduce your risk of ischemic stroke due to AFib is by reducing the chance of blood clots forming. PRADAXA reduces the risk of a blood clot forming in patients with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem

Rare Surgery for Heart Condition

Rare Surgery for Heart Condition Performed for the First Time at Methodist University Hospital

Published On 08/23/2013

Patient Ernestine and Dr. Kabra at Methodist University Hospital

Photo: Ernestine Jones is grateful for Dr. Rajesh Kabra's dedication. He  found an uncommon surgical procedure that was the perfect solution for her cardiac issue. 

Ernestine Jones is extremely thankful for her physician Rajesh Kabra, M.D., medical director of electrophysiology and ablation services for Methodist University Hospital and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Dr. Kabra specializes in cardiac pacing and arrhythmia issues.

Jones appreciates the time he invested to find the right treatment option that met her needs and very possibly saved her life. In rare cases an ICD can be implanted under the skin in the lower abdomen with the leads using the iliac vein in the groin to gain access to the heart. This surgical procedure had never been done at Methodist University Hospital.

“He didn’t give up on me,” says Ernestine Jones.

Lupus attacked her heart and kidneys in 2012, sending her to dialysis three times a week. In addition to this, she went into cardiac arrest where her heart stopped beating. Jones was left in a coma for two days. Dr. Kabra diagnosed Jones with ventricular fibrillation a heart rhythm which results in the heart beating so rapidly causing the heart to stop circulating blood throughout the body.

She needed an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, there was a problem. Her catheter for dialysis had clogged the vein that the leads from the defibrillator needed to gain access to her heart.

“Typically, an ICD is implanted above the heart,” said Dr. Kabra. “In Ernestine’s case, the ICD couldn’t be planted above the heart, so I researched other options that might help.”

In the meantime, Dr. Kabra ordered Jones a LifeVest, a wearable defibrillator for patients who are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest. LifeVest protects patients from cardiac arrest while doctors determine what course of action is best.

“It was very important to me to find an option that would work for Ernestine,” said Dr. Kabra. “When I learned that an ICD could be implanted below the heart I collaborated with Dr. Eva Proctor, a cardiothoracic surgeon with The CardioVascular Center. I placed an ICD lead from the groin into the heart, while Dr. Proctor created a pocket under the skin of the abdomen to implant the ICD. These complicated and innovative procedures require collaborative efforts from multiple specialties and we are fortunate to have such an environment at Methodist University Hospital.”

Dr. Proctor says the procedure Jones needed was rather rare, but it was a procedure Jones couldn’t live without.

“It was very important for Ernestine to have the ICD because this device will provide some safety for her against premature death from ventricular arrhythmia,” said Dr. Proctor.

Jones says she feels 100% better. This former hair stylist is looking forward to completing the course she needs to teach hairstyling.

Dr. Rajesh Kabra, Cardio Electrophysiologist

Dr. Rejesh Kabra, MD

Rajesh Kabra, M.D., FHRS

Education

Medical Degree (MBBS - Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
Internship - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
Residency in Internal Medicine - University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA

Residency in Internal Medicine - St. Francis Hospital of Evanston, IL
Fellowship in Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology - Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Fellowship in Cardiovascular Diseases - University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA

Board Certifications

Internal Medicine
Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology
Cardiovascular Disease

Professional Interests

Atrial fibrillation
Ablation of common and complex cardiac arrhythmias
Cardiac electrophysiologic study and mapping

Clinical cardiology and cardiac arrhythmia
Heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy
Pacemaker and cardiac defibrillator (ICD) Implantation

American Heart Association facts: Women & Heart Disease

Facts About Heart Disease in Women

Do you know what causes heart disease in women? What about the survival rate? Or whether women of all ethnicities share the same risk?

The fact is: Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, causing 1 in 3 deaths each year. That’s approximately one woman every minute!

But it doesn’t affect all women alike, and the warning signs for women aren’t the same in men. What’s more: These facts only begin to scratch the surface.

There are a several misconceptions about heart disease in women, and they could be putting you at risk. The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement advocates for more research and swifter action for women’s heart health for this very reason. In this section, we’ll arm you with the facts and dispel some myths – because the truth can no longer be ignored.

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    Understanding Congenital Heart Defects

    Up to 1.3 million Americans alive today have some form of congenital heart defect and at least nine of every 1,000 infants born each year have a heart defect. Learn more about heart defects and testing in infants. »

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    Sex & Heart Disease

    Readjusting to everyday life can be tough for heart disease patients. You wonder about everything, including your sex life — or if it’s safe to have sex at all. Here's what you need to know. »

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    Atherosclerosis & Stroke

    Atherosclerosis may be caused by high blood pressure, physical inactivity and other factors. It causes the artery walls to harden and may result in stroke. Learn more about atherosclerosis and stroke. »

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    Arteriosclerosis is a general term for the thickening and hardening of arteries. Learn what causes atherosclerosis, including high blood pressure and cholesterol levels as well as cigarette smoke. »

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    Silent Heart Attack: Symptoms, Risks

    A heart attack without obvious symptoms is called a silent heart attack, or medically referred to as silent ischemia. »

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    ABOUT AFIB & RISK OF STROKE

    AFib affects over 2 million people in the U.S. alone

    What is AFib?

    Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is the most common type of irregular heartbeat. It occurs when one or both of the upper chambers of the heart – called the atria – don’t beat the way they should. This can cause blood to pool in the left atrium, where a blood clot can form. If that clot breaks away, it can travel to the brain, where it can cause a type of stroke called an ischemic (is-KEE-mic) stroke. An ischemic stroke occurs when a clot lodges in an artery supplying blood to the brain, reducing blood flow and depriving part of the brain of oxygen and nutrients.

    AFib affects more than 2 million people in the United States. The odds of developing AFib go up with age. In fact, it is estimated that AFib is the most common type of irregular heartbeat in people over the age of 65.

    doctor checking patient for fib and risk of stroke

    Do you know the symptoms of AFib?

    It is possible to have AFib without having any symptoms and to be unaware of your condition until a doctor discovers it during a physical exam.

    When there are symptoms, they can include:

    • palpitations
    • weakness
    • fatigue
    • reduced ability to exercise
    • lightheadedness
    • dizziness
    • confusion
    • shortness of breath
    • chest pain

    Do you know the signs of a stroke?

    If you or your loved one has AFib, you’ll need to know the signs of stroke. By using the simple acronym F.A.S.T., you’ll be able to quickly recognize if your loved one may be suffering a stroke. That’s important because it could be a situation where seconds count.

    Take a few minutes to commit this acronym to memory:

    • FACE: Ask your loved one to smile. Does one side of his or her face droop?
    • ARMS: Ask your loved one to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
    • SPEECH: Ask your loved one to repeat a simple phrase. Does his or her speech sound slurred or strange?
    • TIME: Time is crucial. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you or your loved one has any of these symptoms

    Working closely with your doctor is important to develop a treatment plan that can help reduce your risk of stroke. Our Doctor Discussion Guide can help you ask the right questions to assist your doctor in deciding if PRADAXA is right for you.

    Some common myths about AFib

    With the tremendous amount of material about AFib available, you may occasionally come across conflicting information. We’re here to help dispel some common AFib myths. These include:

    Myth 1:
     Everyone who has AFib will have symptoms.
    Not true. Some people with AFib will have no symptoms at all, and yet may still suffer a sudden stroke.
    Myth 2:
     If you take medication for AFib and no longer have symptoms, you’re cured.
    The fact is you may still have AFib whether or not you feel symptoms, and it is very often a lifelong condition.
    Myth 3:
     Warfarin, also known as Coumadin® or Jantoven®, is the only medication approved by the FDA to reduce risk of stroke due to AFib.
    Not true. Among the new drugs approved for this condition, PRADAXA was the first alternative to warfarin approved by the FDA to reduce the risk of stroke due to AFib not caused by a heart valve problem. See how the two compare. Since FDA approval in October 2010, nearly 10 million prescriptions have been filled in the U.S.

    Learn more about the risk factors for developing AFib.

    AFib can put you at 5x greater risk of a stroke

    The number of AFib-related strokes can be staggering

    Did you know that every year in this country, about 156,000 people have AFib-related strokes? Here are some other facts too important to ignore:

    • AFib causes up to 1 in every 5 strokes
    • Some people with AFib may have no symptoms

    PRADAXA reduces the risk of ischemic stroke due to AFib not caused by a heart valve problem

    An ischemic stroke occurs when a clot lodges in an artery supplying blood to the brain, reducing blood flow and depriving part of the brain of oxygen and nutrients. The most important way to reduce your risk of ischemic stroke due to AFib is by reducing the chance of blood clots forming. PRADAXA reduces the risk of a blood clot forming in patients with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem

Kind regards

Betty J. Lamarr